Sometimes finding your RAM (memory) specifications is a big bothersome task. Especially when Windows 10 fails to deliver the information by using the task manager. As in my example below:

The fastest and most easy way without installing any additional software to get this information is by using the command prompt line. Simply type CMD into your search bar and right-click Run as administrator.
It might look a bit scary or even Matrixy (no worries nobody will show up at your door and offer you red or blue pills – well except if you live in a shady part of your town but that’s another story) to somebody that has never opened a command prompt before but trust me it’s no big deal.

 

Check memory manufacturer

To determine the brand of the memory modules installed on the device, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the memory manufacturer name and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, manufacturer

Check memory part number

To find out the part number of each memory module, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to find the memory part number and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, partnumber

Check memory capacity

Using the Command Prompt, you can find out the total capacity per module and the entire system.

Determine capacity per memory module

To determine each memory module capacity, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to find out the memory capacity and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, capacity

The capacity information is displayed in bytes, but you can divide the number by 1073741824 (1 gigabyte in bytes) to convert the information into gigabytes.

Determine total system memory capacity

You can also quickly find out the total amount of memory installed on the device using these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the total physical memory and press Enter:systeminfo | findstr /C:"Total Physical Memory"

Check memory speed

To confirm the operating memory speed, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the memory speed and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, speed

BIG NOTE: If you are using an ASUS/MSI motherboard this might not be the maximum speed that can be utilized by your RAM sticks. In my case, they are 3200MHz that were working with less speed. This is what happens when you throw together your computer and don’t check your BIOS settings. If you check XMP (Extreme Memory Profile) in your BIOS settings you can get better ram speeds. More on that in another post.

Check memory type

To check the system memory type on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the memory type and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, memorytype

No worries 24 is an actual number that means something. Here is the complete list:

  • 0: Unknown.
  • 1: Other.
  • 2: DRAM.
  • 3: Synchronous DRAM.
  • 4: Cache DRAM.
  • 5: EDO.
  • 6: EDRAM.
  • 7: VRAM.
  • 8: SRAM.
  • 9: RAM.
  • 10: ROM.
  • 11: Flash.
  • 12: EEPROM.
  • 13: FEPROM.
  • 14: EPROM.
  • 15: CDRAM.
  • 16: 3DRAM.
  • 17: SDRAM.
  • 18: SGRAM.
  • 19: RDRAM.
  • 20: DDR.
  • 21: DDR2.
  • 22: DDR2 FB-DIMM.
  • 24: DDR3.
  • 25: FBD2.

Check memory form factor

To determine whether the modules are DIMM or SODIMM, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the memory form factor and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, formfactor

And again here is a list of what the codes actually mean:

  • 0: Unknown.
  • 1: Other.
  • 2: SIP.
  • 3: DIP.
  • 4: ZIP.
  • 5: SOJ
  • 6: Proprietary.
  • 7: SIMM.
  • 8: DIMM.
  • 9: TSOP.
  • 10: PGA.
  • 11: RIMM.
  • 12: SODIMM.
  • 13: SRIMM.
  • 14: SMD.
  • 15: SSMP.
  • 16: QFP.
  • 17: TQFP.
  • 18: SOIC.
  • 19: LCC.
  • 20: PLCC.
  • 21: BGA.
  • 22: FPBGA.
  • 23: LGA.
  • 24: FB-DIMM.

Check all memory details

The above commands can help you to find the most useful information about the modules. However, there is another command you can use to query all the available details.

To list all the memory details, then use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to view all the memory details and press Enter:wmic memorychip list full

Check multiple details in one line

Type the following command to view only the specific details and press Enter:

wmic memorychip get devicelocator, manufacturer, partnumber, serialnumber, capacity, speed, memorytype, formfactor

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